Earth Science Week 2016

Earth Science Week kicks off Sunday, October 9, 2016, and this year’s theme, chosen by the American Geosciences Institute, is “Our Shared Geoheritage”. Geoheritage is “the collection of natural wonders, landforms, and resources that have formed over eons and come to this generation to manage, use, and conserve effectively. Geoheritage locations are valued for many reasons, including scientific, economic, […]

June TsuInfo Now Available

This issue of TsuInfo includes articles on: Dedication of the nation’s first tsunami vertical evacuation structure   New outreach products from the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration First ever world Tsunami Awareness Day set to debut in November Also featured are tsunami project updates, news, newly published research, and […]

Meet our New Landslide Hazards Program

Washington’s widely varying climate and topography along with complex geology creates many areas that are prone to landslides.  Identifying past landslides is the best way to identify future landslide hazards. After the devastating SR530 “Oso” Landslide in March 2014, the state legislature recognized the need for a greater emphasis on landslide mapping. Resources were allocated to […]

Newly published: Rock aggregate resource inventory map of Lewis County, Washington

We are pleased to announce the release of a new publication! Rock aggregate resource inventory map of Lewis County, Washington by Daniel W. Eungard Summary: Rock aggregate is one of the fundamental building blocks of roads, bridges, and buildings that use concrete. Luckily for us in Washington, the Pleistocene glaciers that once covered all of the […]

New and improved! Have another look at DNR’s landslide hazard website

There have been some important changes to our landslide hazard website since we last blogged about it on November 1, 2012. We have improved the resolution of the map by adding the National Weather Service (NWS) forecast zones. A shaded relief of elevation, along with the addition of salt and fresh water features, improves the […]

Shallow landslides can be triggered by rainy weather–Do you know the warning signs?

Heavy rain this weekend can cause more than just localized flooding and high rivers. Prolonged or intense rainfall increases the chances of shallow landslides on steep slopes. During these rain events some rain will flow on the surface to streams and rivers, some is captured by vegetation, and some rain infiltrates into the ground. The […]

Watching Washington Evolve

Our talented cartographers have put together a great animation showing the evolution of Washington geology. Based on the previous work of Jack Powell and John Figge, the cartoon shows the accretion of terranes through geologic time from the Neoproterozoic (~750 million years ago) to the present. It demonstrates how the breakup and reconstitution of ancient […]

New Geology Display in NRB Rotunda

The introduction of the mandate that the DGER office door must now remain closed during business hours (due to security concerns) meant that the public could no longer view our rock and mineral collection on a walk-in basis. No matter–this inconvenience motivated us to keep geology in the public eye by creating an updated display […]

New geologic maps are free to download

Originally posted on Ear to the Ground:
This outcrop on the east shore of Dabob Bay contains faulted and folded sediments thought to be about 100,000 years old, which is considered young in geologic terms. Photo: Trevor Contreras/DNR. This outcrop, which features faulted and folded sediments possibly related to an earthquake fault, is on the…