Nepal quake reminder of Washington’s tectonic influences

Ear to the Ground

The U.S. Geological Survey produced a report on the magnitude 7.8 earthquake that struck Nepal April 25 and the surrounding aftershocks that continued throughout much of south central Asia. The U.S. Geological Survey produced a report on the magnitude 7.8 earthquake that struck Nepal April 25 and the surrounding aftershocks that continued throughout much of south central Asia.

The magnitude 7.8 earthquake that devastated the Kathmandu Valley of Nepal Saturday was the strongest quake in the world so far this year and a reminder of the importance of properly planning in advance for natural disasters. More than 4,000  were reported dead, as buildings collapsed in cities surrounding the fault line.

The shallow depth of the quake’s epicenter was placed between 7 and 10 miles. Waves were amplified through sedimentary basin of a former lake, increasing the destruction. The strength of the quake was so strong it was picked up by a Pacific Northwest Seismic Network seismometer at Gold Mountain on the Kitsap Peninsula.

Saturday’s earthquake was the result of the northward movement of the Indian tectonic Plate under the…

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